Gear List | 4 Day - 3 Night Backpacking Light | 1

Overlook - Rock

Fall & Early Spring (25 F - 60 F) Backpacking Gear List | Mountains of NC, VA, TN
(colder temps: not summer, but not winter either) 

 

Gear lists evolve, and so should we. The gear you take on any adventure should be paired down to only what you really need to survive at your required level of comfort, or should I say the threshold of discomfort that we’re each willing to make. Which means, not every gear list is compatible for every person, or location. BUT, there are fundamentals in every gear list that should not be left at home. Example: There are levels of camping that go from cabin, car camp, backpacking, ultralight, and then there is “stupid” light. "Stupid" light is not taking those essential pieces of gear for basic survival or any level of enjoyable comfort. This gear list is more along the lines of backpacking, to ultralight backpacking, depending on the items you feel comfortable with either taking or leaving behind that 1) keeps you safe, 2) gives you a level of comfort that makes the adventure enjoyable for you.

Strive for lighter gear, but take what you know works. For instance, my hard shell jacket is a little more robust, BUT I know that it will not fail me when I need it most for what I'm doing. Make your own choice and try it out. Adjust where needed for your comfort, and cut where you can.  

The reason I’m specifying the time of year and location on this gear list, is because the weather can deliver drastic temperature changes, and the type of precipitation you experience in the eastern mountains of the Blueridge depending on your elevation. Going from 55 and sunny to 36 and raining, to overnight temps of 28 and waking up to frozen ice, and occasionally snow. In the Spring, snowmelt will make the creeks and rivers rise and many of the trails where you could previously have tip-toed over exposed rocks, will now have to be forded in waist high water. Therefore, having lightweight water-crossing shoes to change into, or footwear that you don’t mind hiking 5 miles in wet but knowing they will dry quickly is essential if you don’t want to carry an extra 10-14 ounces.

We’ll be able to cut more weight and remove items in the summer months of July & August, and we’d definitely prepare differently for desert travel, or glacier mountaineering. I’ll cover those additions and changes in a later Blog.

In order to go "Fast & Light", you may have to sacrifice a certain level of comfort, and advancements in technology and new gear have greatly reduced the amount of packed weight we carry. 

The fundamental big 5, however are not usually things you should ever go without on an overnight trip.

1. Footwear - Boots/Shoes

2. Carry System - Alpine Style Backpack

3. Sleep System - Sleeping Bag (layered, down filled, or synthetics)

4. Sleep Pad - Insulation (inflatable, closed cell foam)

5. Shelter System- Tent/Hammock/Tarp

 

 

GEAR LIST 

Backpack & Sleep System:

Weight (lbs)

Backpack: Simple, light internal frame pack with 50-60 liters of carrying capacity.

Tube style, top loading drawstring without extra compartments and unnecessary zippers are best and can reduce the weight of the bag. I do prefer one with a removeable lid, with at least one pouch on the waist-belt for easy to reach items while on the trail. I pack everything inside the pack and nothing outside on the exterior pockets. Those are reserved for rescue gear and snow tools during bigger more difficult climbs, which aren't needed for this type of trip. However, I pack the same way each time, so I know exactly where gear is supposed to be every time I need it, and prevents lost time from searching through all of your contents to find the one item. Muscle memory from repetition.

The volume chosen should reflect experience level packing and quality of gear. Practice packing your gear if choosing a smaller volume pack.

If you are selecting a pack without an internal frame support, you should be aware that these are not meant to support loads over 25-30 pounds with any level of comfort on the trail. They are Ultralight Packs, therefore your gear carried should also reflect ultralight.

2-3

 

Sleeping bag: a bag rated 15° to 25° f will keep you very warm. You may use either down or synthetic.

Note: Down fill bags are lighter & pack down much better but lose the ability to insulate if they get wet since the loft is what warms the air between the fill. Synthetic bags are typically heavier & bulkier to pack down but can continue to provide some insulation when wet.

I prefer down over synthetics here, because I protect and waterproof all my gear with redundancy. I also use a lightweight 32° F bag that I can add a layer too if needed or heat water and fill a Nalgene up for the night if temps drop below freezing.

1.1

 

Compression stuff sack for sleeping bag (1 oz)

0.075

 This

  =>

Inflatable Sleeping Pad: A full-length, latest model inflatable sleeping pad is recommended. R value should be > than 4 if you sleep cold and need more insulation to stay warm at night, or want to drop some weight in your sleeping bag.

I use the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir X-Therm with R Value of 6.9 so I can go a little lighter on the sleeping bag.

We recommend bringing a valve repair/body patch kit.

1

 OR

  =>

Closed cell foam pad: (Optional to Inflatable) 

Therm-a-Rest:

Z-Lite Sol weighs 14 oz with R value of 2

Ridgecrest SOLite weighs 14 oz with R value of 2.1

Pros - virtually indestructable, will never deflate because of a pinhole. Can be used on rocks/scree or combined with an inflatable for boosting the R value over 7

Cons - less warmth to weight than NeoAir inflatable alone, bulkier than inflatable, takes up a lot of space, and usually must go on outside of pack.

0

 

Shelter, Water & Cooking

If traveling in a group, these items would be divided with paired tentmates to distribute weight evenly. If solo, then use the lightest possible of each.

 Weight (lbs)

 

Tent: 3 season tent with vestibule. Consists of Body, Fly, Stakes, Poles, footprint. 

If hiking with a partner, having 2 doors is a must unless you don't mind climbing over each other.

Hammock: Underquilt(s) is/(are) required. 

Tarp or fastpitch: Expect heavy rain, Consistent days of rain, with high winds during this time, and although lighter, this is not my preferred method.

1.5-3

 

Water Purification (14 oz): hand pump style filters work best in this area, but gravity bags are also excellent if you can stay near the rivers and creeks and have the ability to scoop the water up.

On ridgelines, water can be scarce but there are some hidden springs (wet spots really that can be dug out) where the hand pump really does much better than the gravity bags.

MSR Hyperflow MicroFilter

Katadyn

Be careful not to let the sediment clog your filter to the point that you break the handle off. There are methods to prevent that from happening, or clean the filter if it becomes difficult to pump.

A word on Water purification tabs: I would much rather filter out impurities, than add a chemical to kill organisms in the water I'm drinking. Think about this, I can pump water out of a mudhole that looks like chocolate milk and the water comes out clean. If I only had tablets, I'd still be drinking chocolate milk water with bugs floating in it. Oh yeah, there are horse trails all along these areas, so probably some horse dung too. But it would be "purified" by the chemicals you just put in it? No thanks.

0.87

 

Stove (13.1 oz) * Fuel (9 oz) *: 

Jetboils - Will only be rehydrating meals, making coffee, tea etc while in camp. These will not be used on the trail. 

I use the JetBoil Flash here because of the increased water capacity of being able to boil 1L at a time for when I may need to make a hot water bottle at night when the temps get really low, or when traveling with a partner or group where the fuel canister can be handed off to carry.

The MicroMo, Stash, or Zip are other options if you want to cut more weight and don't mind the lower volumes if going solo.

1.3

 

Water Bladder(s) 6 oz : For in camp 

4 Liter MSR Dromedary bags work great, for when your camp is not near water. On the Black Mountain Crest Trail, the nearest water to camp is 1/2 mile down the side of a steep trail, with nowhere to set up for camp. If going in February you can save yourself the 1 mile round trip by melting snow and storing it in these dromedary bags.

0.37

 

Head:

Weight (lbs)

 

Wool/Synthetic ski style Hat (1.5 oz) : A wool or synthetic hat that covers the head and ears comfortably. NO COTTON

A cap style hat is recommended, and I sleep with this on my head with the buff pulled up the back so it doesn't come off in the middle of the night.

This is typically worn in camp and on rest breaks to stay warmer while not actively on the move. 

0.09

 

Neck gaiter/buff (.75 oz): A must-have for all outdoor activities, the UV Buff is a versatile replacement for the bandana and serves a multitude of purposes. Great while on the move in high winds to cover your ears and keep your synthetic baseball cap from blowing away by bringing the back side up over your head while leaving the front of your face exposed or covered depending on what your preference is.

Should be Synthetic material - NO COTTON

0.05

 

Sun hat (2.5 oz): Any style of lightweight hat for shading the head will work well. Baseball caps are the most common.

Should be Synthetic material - NO COTTON

0.15

 

Headlamp (3 oz) includes 3 AAA batteries: 

LED headlamps work well in cold temps and are pretty much the standard these days. Get one that has good range of lighting options, more than a basic model. The Red Lamp feature is great for when you share a tent with another.

0.18

 

Spare Batteries for headlamp (1.3 oz) 3 AAA: we strongly recommend lithium batteries as they perform well in a cold environment. Bring 2 sets - make sure you have new batteries in your headlamp before your trip with the spare set in a ziplock bag.

0.08

 

Upper body:

Weight (lbs)

 

Light Weight Wicking baselayer (5 - 8 oz): One short-sleeved or 3/4 zip neck long-sleeve baselayer top.

(Zip-neck styles will allow for better temperature regulation if your only baselayer is long-sleeved. This is usually the only lightweight base layer I take.) 

Synthetic or Wool - NO COTTON

0.35

 This

   =>

Soft shell layer

(Optional to Medium weight insulating layer): This breathable but wind-and-weather resistant jacket is a key part of any mountaineering layering system. This layer must fit well over your baselayer top. 

0

 OR

   =>

Medium weight insulating layer (12 oz) Fleece

(Optional to Soft Shell Layer):  A mid-weight, form-fitting, lightweight fleece layer for use over baselayers or as a baselayer in cooler conditions.

0.75

 

Lightweight Rain "shell" jacket: A non-insulated, fully waterproof shell jacket with a hood. Must fit comfortably over your baselayer, midlayer, or softshell.

Make sure that while wearing this over layers you want to keep dry, that the sleeves do not allow water to wick up your wrists (most have velcro straps), or is long enough to completely cover the bottom portion near the waist.

I rarely if ever wear this layer while on the trail on the move, because of "wetting out" from sweat unless I know that I'll only be descending. SO this is typically worn in camp, or during rest breaks when putting on insulating layers to keep them dry and having a snack and water. 

0.75

 

Poncho (Optional to rain jacket): I hate ponchos, having worn them in the Marine Corps, but I will say they do serve a purpose for those on a tighter budget, and you can cover yourself and your backpack simultaneously. I waterproof my pack with trash compactor bags that also double as compartment organizers. So I don't need the floppy poncho, or a pack cover that will just keep getting torn off through the tight overgrown trails, or allow the rain to go between your back and the pack anyway and still soak everything. Pack Covers are for light drizzle, not a consistent downpour, so I never use them and never will.

0

 

Light Puffy Jacket with hood (9 oz): The puffy is worn primarily in camp, and at rest breaks in bad weather that your midweight layer may be insufficient for you to keep your core temps warm. Goose down is recommended versus synthetic fill. It does not have to be waterproof, but that is a nice feature. 

This is also part of my sleep system layering as I like to cut weight on my sleeping bag, but also hang out of the bag because I'm larger and hate mummy style bags. 

If it's warmer, the puffy also has a pocket that the rest of the jacket stuffs into to create a pillow, but before manufacturers added that as an option, I used to roll it all up into the hood and close the drawstring to do the same thing.

.6

 

Lower body:

Weight (lbs)

 

Synthetic underwear: wear one pair. Leave one pair in the car to change into on the ride home. Ex-Officio Mid Briefs are my go to. NO COTTON

0.15

 

Light weight baselayer (Optional): light to medium weight wool or synthetic bottoms for in camp. NO COTTON

Note: You will not wear these while on the trail. I don't take this additional layer as my legs do not get cold as long as my upper body stays warm. 

0

 

Softshell Climbing pant (Convertible style is really nice for what we'll be doing): Stretchy, comfortable, non-insulated softshell pants will be worn the entire duration of the climb/hike and should fit comfortably with or without your baselayer bottoms.

These do not need to be waterproofed for a trip like this if bringing a shell pant below, but can really help shed water away and keep you drier longer. Waterproofing is an absolute must for glacial travel and big mountain climbs even with having a hardshell pant

1

 

Lightweight Rain "hardshell" pant: Non-insulated, fully waterproof shell pants that fit comfortably over your baselayer bottoms and softshell pants. Full-length separating side zippers are preferred; shorter side zippers are sufficient if you can still put on and take off your pants without removing your boots.

0.75

 

Feet:

Weight (lbs)

 

Alpine Hiking/Approach Shoes/Boots: Lightweight leather or synthetic hiking boots. Mid height is preferred over below ankle models, simply for increased ankle support when carrying heavier loads on trails with lots of roots, loose rock, or uneven/unpredictable terrain.

La Sportiva Boulder X

La Sportiva TX4 Mid GTX

1.46

 

Hiking socks: Two pairs (one worn, one packed) of Lightweight to Midweight hiking socks. Wool and synthetic materials only - NO COTTON.

Newer socks offer increased loft, warmth, and padding than older socks. Must fit comfortably over liner socks if you choose to use liner socks.

1

 

Liner socks (optional): If using liner socks, you will need two pairs of smooth, thin wool or synthetic socks. Liner socks can reduce boot friction and increase comfort for some. Must fit well underneath hiking socks.

0

 

Camp/watercrossing footwear (Optional): Can be flipflops, Crocks or merrell style lightweight slip on for water crossings (heal strap/support is strongly recommended for water crossings and fast moving water) or comfortable wear around camp and let your feet "rest".

.75

 

Misc.  items

Weight (lbs)

 

Physical MAP of the area & Compass: 6 oz

You should have a waterproof trail map of the area you will be in and know how to orient the map to your location using features and landmarks, using triangulation of a compass bearing. 

Pisgah Map Co.

National Geographic - Maps

Foothills Maps 

Books, Guides, Maps  

 .37

Cell Phone: 8.2 oz (Maps 3D Pro GPS App, Earthmate app)

 

This is the best 3D app I've ever used. We may put up some tutorials on how to set it up, create a map, download tiles, create a track, etc. It also allows you to create waypoints with pictures embedded in them associated with the track you are on, and the map that you've created.

The Earthmate app is used to link the GPS SAT communication to your cell phone to send messages like a text via bluetooth link instead of the clunky interface directly on the device. I only use this for the texting interface as the map/location tracking is not as user friendly as the Maps 3D pro.

.5

 

Wrist Watch (2 oz) :

 .125

 

Garmin InReach Mini: (Optional) Iridium SAT communicator .21
Backup Battery Pack: (Optional) GOALZERO .4 - .6
Sunscreen as required 0
Lip protection as required 0

 

Knife (.6 oz) or multi-tool (1 oz):

Pick one, you don’t need both: small to medium size. Keep it simple and light, enough to cut cordage.

 

 

Lighter ( .7 oz) & Firestarter ( 3-4 oz) : 2 small bic lighters can work, with one as backup. OR I started carrying a single UST butane waterproof lighter that's refillable and does not rely on an unreliable flint or striker in wet conditions, and really does withstand high winds. 

0.3

 

Water bottle(s) (6 oz each): (Two,  1 liter capacity bottles) Bottles should be wide mouth made of copolyester (BPA free plastic). Water bag or bladder systems are optional.

I use Nalgene Wide mouth bottles. Can also be used to store food items that are easily crushed or even eggs. Used to make hot water bottles at night. Boiling water will melt thin plastic smart water & Gatorade bottles. 

Filling is easier with a wide mouth and while on snow or glacier, you'll be able to scoop up snow & Ice to make water. 

0.7

 

3 Trash compactor bags (large): we recommend lining your backpack with these bags to keep items in your backpack completely dry. 2mm or thicker so they do not rip when you pack.

We'll show you how to properly pack and waterproof your gear with the "first in, last out" principle for tube style top load packing organization.

ULTRASAC 18 Gallon - 2.5 mil Compactor Bags

0.1

 

Freezer zip-lock bags (gallon and quart): Used to pack food and doubles as your personal trash bag after use.

0.08

 

Ear plugs: OPTIONAL for sleeping, if you have a noisy tentmate.

0.01

 

Small Personal First-Aid Kit: 2.2 oz

Basic medical supplies in a compact package- we recommend nail trimmers, basic painkillers, Moleskin & Molefoam, first-aid tape, Band-Aids, and anti-septic wipes or gel.

My entire kit shown weighs 2.2 oz, and I included a pair of surgical scissors for delicate work, or trimming moleskin.

0.14

 

Hand Warmers: (Optional) - As required.

0

 

Lightweight Camp Chair: Used in camp and longer breaks on the trail. Do not bring a car camping style chair.

I use the MUHL X  with my trekking poles, and customized it (non-production) with carbon fiber uprights. Being 6 ft 4 inches tall and large, this is the lightest fullsize chair that gets me off the ground and supports me where I need it most.

The CAPRA is bombproof if you want a stand alone chair without using your trekking poles.

1.5

Food Bag (1 oz): Consolidate all of your repackaged food into an 6L-8L roll top waterproof bag. This prevents overpacking food items and doubles as an easy way to hang all of your food up and away from camp while you sleep.

.06

 

Bear/Critter Food Bag rope, 1 Large Carabiner, 1 small carabiner: 4.8 oz

Nylon #550 parachute cord with 2 carabiners (1 large carabiner, 1 micro-carabiner). The carabiners are clipped onto a loop on each end of the cord, and wound for storage. Using the Large carabiner as a counterweight to throw over the limb. If the biner is too light, the cord will never overcome the friction of the bark on the limb and come down to where you can grab it. This is actually my favorite people watching event (trying to hang their food bags up).

Work with your tentmate, you can share one of these. Can also be used for other purposes other than hanging your food. No more than 50 ft of cord.

This is a much lighter solution over a bear can. Try not to ever eat food in your tent, or leave food items (even wrappers) in your tent. Rainy days make it difficult, just be sure to clean up every crumb if you don't have some duct tape to make repairs.

This isn't just for bears. Mice love to chew holes in tents to get at your GORP you left in your pocket. And bears apparently love toothpaste.

Be sure to check with the local Ranger Station to get updates on what is required for each location you'll be in. 

National Parks Alerts by state

US Forest Service

0.3

 

Toilet articles

 

Weight (lbs)

 

Oral Care Kit: 1.7 oz

Toothbrush, Tooth Paste, Floss - small and light, you can even cut the handle off to shed some weight.

0.1

 

Potty Kit: 2.5 oz

 

Wipes (bio-degradeable) - don't bother with toilet paper.

I don't take a huge package, but repackage what I'll need. Factor 3 "napkins" per the 3 mornings on the trail = 9 wipes.

Hand sanitizer: personal size.

Trust me, you do not want to get the montazuma's revenge a few days after you get back from your trip, or during your trip for that matter. USE HAND SANITIZER to prevent getting sick from micro-organisms and fecal matter.

0.15

 

Trowel (1.5 oz) - Can be shared with tentmate or just use a stick and leave at home.

When you need to go on a sincere level though, its best to have the right tool for the job. I'm not the guy who holds it for 4 days, or even half a day for that matter. It's healthier for you to GO! And Lighter.

0.09

 

Utensils

Weight (lbs)

 

Bowl or insulated mug, not both

0.3

 

Spoon (.4 oz) or spork, not both

The MSR folding spoon is the one I take because it packs small (folded), and when unfolded it can reach all the way down into the corners of the bigger bags of freeze dried re-hydrated meals.

0.03

 

Eyes:

 

Sunglasses (optional depending on personal preference): Choose sunglasses that effectively block out the sun’s UV rays from all possible reflective surfaces.

On the AT, you'll be under canopy of trees alot of the time, but on ridgeline peaks and outcroppings, you'll want them.

For reference: Glacial travel and snowy expeditions, eye protection is not optional.

0.09

 

Hands:

Weight (lbs)

 

Light Weight Liner glove (Not Required: optional depending on personal preference): Very lightweight wool or synthetic liner gloves that offer a snug, comfortable fit. 

0

 

 

Technical gear:

Weight (lbs)

 

Trekking poles: lightweight and collapsible. Used to help support getting over downed trees, which are many in this area, and a huge help for water crossings. Used also to set up many tents and shelters, and can be paired with the MUHL X trekking pole chair by MULIBEX.

1.2

 

Food: (Total breakfast/lunch/snacks/dinner should not weigh more than 4.0 lbs for 4 full days). For Reference - Glacial mountaineering would require more calories with more weight per day for food.

4.0

Water: I don't carry more than 2 Liters of water at once, because I pump/filter water where I know I can with proper trail planning, map routing etc. In camp, I do store water in Dromedary Bags so I don't need to filter water in the morning that I want to get back on the trail, or if the water source is further away from camp. 4.4

Pack Weight should be no more than 33 pounds (with food + water + shelter, Stove/fuel + water pump) depending on the quality of your gear. 

For perspective, Ultralight hikers can get to 19-22 lbs with a base weight around 10 lbs.

I'm NOT counting weight for things I'll be wearing, noted optional items, or my trekking Poles as they'll be in my hand assisting me up the trail. 

Packed weight here plus food and water is 27.11 lbs.

When I carry rescue equipment, battery backup pack for iphone/gps app, handheld radio for communication between teams, and Garmin InReach, my pack weight then easily reaches 32-35 lbs.

As a former Marine, anything less than 80 lbs is ultralight, and I'm thankful for not having to carry a M240G machine gun, ammo, grenades, body armor, and Kevlar helmet.

 

 

 

 

 

Recap without commentary on each piece of gear:

 GEAR LIST 

Backpack & Sleep System:

Weight (lbs)

Backpack: 

 

2-3

 

Sleeping bag :

1.1

 

Compression stuff sack for sleeping bag (1 oz)

0.075

 This

  =>

Inflatable Sleeping Pad: 

1

 OR

  =>

Closed cell foam pad: (Optional to Inflatable) 

 

0

 

Shelter, Water & Cooking

If traveling in a group, these items would be divided with paired tentmates to distribute weight evenly. If solo, then use the lightest possible of each.

 Weight (lbs)

 

Tent: 3 season tent with vestibule. Consists of Body, Fly, Stakes, Poles, footprint. 

Hammock: Underquilt(s) is/(are) required. 

Tarp or fastpitch: Expect heavy rain, Consistent days of rain, with high winds during this time, and although lighter, this is not my preferred method.

1.5-3

 

Water Purification (14 oz):

0.87

 

Stove (13.1 oz) * Fuel (9 oz) *: 

 

1.3

 

Water Bladder(s) 6 oz : For in camp 

0.37

 

Head:

Weight (lbs)

 

Wool/Synthetic ski style Hat (1.5 oz) : wool or synthetic - NO COTTON

 

0.09

 

Neck gaiter/buff (.75 oz): Should be Synthetic material - NO COTTON

0.05

 

Sun hat (2.5 oz): Should be Synthetic material - NO COTTON

0.15

 

Headlamp (3 oz) includes 3 AAA batteries: 

0.18

 

Spare Batteries for headlamp (1.3 oz) 3 AAA: 

0.08

 

Upper body:

Weight (lbs)

 

Light Weight Wicking baselayer (5 - 8 oz): Synthetic or Wool - NO COTTON

0.35

 This

   =>

Soft shell layer

(Optional to Medium weight insulating layer): 

0

 OR

   =>

Medium weight insulating layer (12 oz) Fleece

(Optional to Soft Shell Layer):  

0.75

 

Lightweight Rain "shell" jacket: 

0.75

 

Poncho (Optional to rain jacket): 

0

 

Light Puffy Jacket with hood (9 oz): 

.6

 

Lower body:

Weight (lbs)

 

Synthetic underwear: wear one pair. NO COTTON

0.15

 

Light weight baselayer (Optional): 

0

 

Softshell Climbing pant: Convertible style

1

 

Lightweight Rain "hardshell" pant: 

0.75

 

Feet:

Weight (lbs)

 

Alpine Hiking/Approach Shoes/Boots: 

1.46

 

Hiking socks: Two pairs (one worn, one packed) NO COTTON.

1

 

Liner socks (optional): 

0

 

Camp/watercrossing footwear (Optional): 

.75

 

Misc.  items

Weight (lbs)

 

Physical MAP of the area & Compass: 6 oz 

 .37

Cell Phone: 8.2 oz 

(Maps 3D Pro GPS App, Earthmate app)

.5

 

Wrist Watch (2 oz) :

 .125

 

Garmin InReach Mini: (Optional) Iridium SAT communicator .21
Backup Battery Pack: (Optional) GOALZERO .4 - .6
Sunscreen as required 0
Lip protection as required 0

 

Knife (.6 oz) or multi-tool (1 oz):

Pick one, you don’t need both:

 

 

Lighter ( .7 oz) & Firestarter ( 3-4 oz) : 

0.3

 

Water bottle(s) (6 oz each):

(Two,  1 liter capacity bottles) 

 

0.7

 

3 Trash compactor bags (large): 

0.1

 

Freezer zip-lock bags (gallon and quart):

0.08

 

Ear plugs: OPTIONAL

0.05

 

Small Personal First-Aid Kit: 2.2 oz

 

0.14

 

Hand Warmers: (Optional) - As required.

0

 

Lightweight Camp Chair: 

1.5

Food Bag (1 oz): 

.06

 

Bear/Critter Food Bag rope, 1 Large Carabiner, 1 small carabiner: 4.8 oz

 

 

0.3

 

Toilet articles

 

Weight (lbs)

 

Oral Care Kit: 1.7 oz

Toothbrush, Tooth Paste, Floss 

0.1

 

Potty Kit: 2.5 oz

Wipes (bio-degradeable)

Hand sanitizer: 

0.15

 

Trowel (1.5 oz)

0.09

 

Utensils

Weight (lbs)

 

Bowl or insulated mug, not both

0.3

 

Spoon (.4 oz) or spork, not both

0.03

 

Eyes:

 

Sunglasses (optional depending on personal preference): 

0.09

 

Hands:

Weight (lbs)

 

Light Weight Liner glove (Not Required: optional depending on personal preference):

0

 

 

Technical gear:

Weight (lbs)

 

Trekking poles: 

1.2

 

Food: 

4.0

Water: 4.4

Pack Weight should be no more than 33 pounds (with food + water + shelter, Stove/fuel + water pump) depending on the quality of your gear.

For perspective, Ultralight hikers can get to 19-22 lbs with a base weight around 10 lbs.

I'm NOT counting weight for things I'll be wearing, noted optional items, or my trekking Poles as they'll be in my hand assisting me up the trail. 

Packed weight here plus food and water is 27.11 lbs.

 

 

This List will be updated periodically, and will be supplemented in the next post with "How to pack" and waterproof your gear. This will go through the process of using a "First in, Last out" Top Loading method.